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All posts tagged "licensing"


Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Microsoft Says the Hidden Costs of Android Are Expensive

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Windows Phone Talk" @ 09:00 PM

http://gizmodo.com/5625796/microsof...s-are-expensive

"According to Business Insider, Microsoft says that Android's hidden manufacturing costs are much higher than their own $15-per-unit Windows Phone 7 license. They have some very good points, but others are not so good. Here are their arguments..."

Go check out the article and tell me what you think - is Microsoft right? Are the costs of a "free" operating system higher than most people think? I think there's definitely something to be said for an off-the-shelf experience that doesn't require customization to work properly, but thus far, the deficiencies in Android's offering hasn't exactly been slowing down the adoption rate...


Thursday, July 1, 2010

Microsoft Instaload Technology Allows Batteries to be Inserted Either Way

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Digital Home News" @ 12:30 PM

http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/01/...never-insert-a/

"Microsoft Corp. today announced a new technology aimed at improving the battery installation process called InstaLoad battery installation technology, which allows users to easily install a battery without regard to positive and negative polarity. Never again will people have to squint to see battery installation diagrams - the device simply works regardless if the battery is installed positive-side-up or positive-side-down. InstaLoad is a patented battery contact design now available for license by third-party device suppliers, with companies like Duracell already lining up to endorse the technology for use in their own products."

If you've ever replaced batteries in something, only to have it not work because you got the polarity wrong, you'll appreciate Microsoft's technology here. Sometimes the ideas that seem the simplest end up having the most impact - and this could very well be one of them, as long as the licensing fees as low enough to warrant no barriers to adoption. If Duracell is already on board, that's a very good sign - the real proof will be in whether or not this makes it to products in the market over the next year or two. And hopefully it will help Microsoft's rather beat-up stock price...(says the shareholder right here).


Wednesday, April 28, 2010

The Hills Are Alive With The Sound of HTC-Microsoft Licensing!

Posted by Jon Westfall in "Windows Phone Competition" @ 11:30 AM

http://www.microsoft.com/Presspass/press/2010/apr10/04-27MSHTCPR.mspx?rss_fdn=Press Releases

"Microsoft Corp. and HTC Corp. have signed a patent agreement that provides broad coverage under Microsoft's patent portfolio for HTC's mobile phones running the Android mobile platform. Under the terms of the agreement, Microsoft will receive royalties from HTC. The agreement expands HTC's long-standing business relationship with Microsoft. "HTC and Microsoft have a long history of technical and commercial collaboration, and today's agreement is an example of how industry leaders can reach commercial arrangements that address intellectual property," said Horacio Gutierrez, corporate vice president and deputy general counsel of Intellectual Property and Licensing at Microsoft. "We are pleased to continue our collaboration with HTC."

Well here is an interesting story that I've been seeing everywhere this morning. Apparently HTC has inked a licensing deal with Microsoft for the Android phones they sell. Microsoft claims to hold several applicable patents to bits and pieces of the Linux operating system driving Android and thus is demanding royalties from HTC instead of going the Apple "Sue 'Em" route. While some doubt the validity of Microsoft's claim, none have challenged it yet in court. So from this point on, any Android HTC device you buy will see a small bit of $ going to Microsoft. And those of you who went straight from Windows Mobile to Android thought you'd stopped supporting Microsoft financially (With the probable exception of Windows, or Office!).


Thursday, March 18, 2010

Marketplace Can Revoke Application's License - Remotely!

Posted by Jon Westfall in "Windows Phone News" @ 08:30 AM

http://www.engadget.com/2010/03/17/...e-app-licenses/

"Speaking at a MIX10 session about Windows Phone 7 Series architecture this morning, Microsoft's Istvan Cseri mentioned that the Windows Phone Marketplace -- the one and only clearinghouse for apps in WP7S -- will be able to remotely revoke licenses. Since devices will only run properly-licensed apps, this effectively means the company will be able to shut down apps remotely -- a capability they'd probably invoke if a Marketplace app were to badly misbehave en masse, for example."

The paranoid in me says "Whoa... what if I want that app". The sane person in me says this is actually a good thing - it can be invoked to prevent bad applications from messing up the phone experience. While it sacrifices flexibility, it increases the likelihood that your Windows Phone 7 Series experience will be much better than (certainly) Windows Mobile 6.5. Now lets just hope that this 'bad' applications discipline extends to provider bloatware!


Monday, November 9, 2009

Bsquare Takes Over Licensing Of Windows Mobile

Posted by Ed Hansberry in "Pocket PC News" @ 07:00 AM

http://www.istartedsomething.com/20...censing-rights/

"Just when I thought Windows phones had already one too many layers between the end-user and Microsoft, they've just decided to add in one more for good measure. Announced today, Microsoft has signed on a third-party, Bsquare, to be the first and currently exclusive distributor for Windows Mobile licenses worldwide."

This seems to be a total outsourcing move. According to the blog post, not only will Bsquare take over licensing of the OS to mobile phone manufacturers, but they will "also provide reference designs, communication stacks, technical support, training, testing and the like to OEMs."

Licensing doesn't bother me. That is the business end of Windows Mobile and has little to do with the platform itself. I do worry though that by turning over testing, tech support, reference designs, testing and more that Microsoft is further insulated from the device maker, retailer and end user. I am not sure how this will lead to improving the platform overall. Windows Mobile is woefully behind the competition in the marketplace today. Does anyone think this will help close the gap? I'd love to hear the reasoning behind such a view because the logic of it totally escapes me.


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