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All posts tagged "fcc"


Monday, October 25, 2010

HTC 7 Pro Gets FCC Approval: Is CDMA Windows Phone 7 Close?

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Windows Phone News" @ 10:00 AM

http://www.engadget.com/2010/10/25/...s-fcc-approval/

Engadget's FCC-scouring bot - OK, probably a sleep-deprived intern - discovered that a device that is very likely the HTC 7 Pro, has gotten approval. That means that the wireless hardware is finalized, but the software probably needs more time to cook...which means it might be earlier in 2011 than we were led to believe. I guess we'll see!


Friday, January 29, 2010

Toshiba TG02 Whizzes Through FCC

Posted by Jon Westfall in "Toshiba Windows Phones" @ 11:00 PM

http://www.engadget.com/2010/01/29/...ops-by-the-fcc/

"Before the Nexus One and the HD2, there was the Toshiba TG01, sprinting along with a 1GHz Snapdragon in its belly and a 4.1-inch front end. Alas, that phone was hamstrung by a resistive touchscreen and a poorly thought-out skin atop an even worse OS (WinMo 6.1), but even by today's standards its hardware spec is top notch. Color us intrigued, then, to find its successor finally making its FCC debut -- with Bluetooth, GPS and WiFi (802.11b/g) connectivity in tow and a case outline suggesting some earlier leaked shots might still be accurate."

Well, looks like the TG01 is getting a successor. Toshiba is the little OEM that could, and as we've all seen, sometimes they can produce quality devices. But let's just hope the TG02 makes a bigger splash than the TG01.


Monday, July 14, 2008

HTC Touch Diamond Approved, Extended

Posted by Darius Wey in "Pocket PC Hardware" @ 06:40 AM

Despite PC Pro's slamming, the HTC Touch Diamond continues to move forward. First, there's good news for our US readers: the FCC has given the CDMA version two thumbs up, so now it's just a matter of the carriers announcing when and where you'll be able to hand over the dollar bills. In other news, those of you who already have the device may be interested in more juice, because, you know, that 900mAh battery included in the box isn't exactly anything to write home about. Our affiliate hardware store (Expansys) has a 1340mAh version (cover included) available for pre-order, so if you value uptime over girth, be sure to take a look.


Monday, May 26, 2008

Rural Wireless Carriers File FCC Petition Opposing Handset Exclusivity

Posted by Rocco Augusto in "Smartphone Talk" @ 08:36 PM

http://www.engadgetmobile.com/2008/...-handset-exclu/

"If you thought you were annoyed when one of the big wireless carriers locked up a phone you were after, you have no idea how frustrated small and rural wireless carriers are -- they've just filed a petition with FCC seeking to ban the practice. The 80 companies in the Rural Cellular Association serve small markets not well-covered by the big guys, like parts of New Mexico, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, North Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming, and they say that carrier exclusivity deals not affect their bottom line, but also deprive consumers of desirable phones like the iPhone and upcoming Blackberry Bold. They've actually got a pretty good point: lots of rural customers can't purchase and use an iPhone without technically breaking the AT&T service agreement. We'll see how this one goes -- although we'd love nothing more than to use any phone we wanted on any carrier, there are plenty of reasons it won't happen, and exclusivity is the easiest way for carriers to differentiate themselves to consumers."



As a consumer I really hope that in the coming years we start to see an end to all of the exclusivity contracts. I can understand them to a point but in the case of the iPhone, as mentioned above, was five years really necessary? Also I think the iPhone is a horrible example of a handset to use an example here since a lot of the rural carriers I can think of off the top of my head all run off of CDMA networks and the iPhone is a GSM and soon to be HSDPA handset. Even if the exclusivity deal was not in place, do you really expect Apple to make a CDMA version just to be fair to the little guys? A lot of high-end handsets have trouble selling in densely populated areas and if there is not enough customer demand to convince the big five to open shops in those rural areas, what makes the little carriers think they could even secure those fancy handsets in the first place?


Monday, March 24, 2008

AT&T, Verizon, and Google Chime in on FCC Auction Aftermath

Posted by Rocco Augusto in "Smartphone News" @ 08:00 PM

http://www.engadgetmobile.com/2008/...tion-aftermath/

"Win or lose, all the bidders wrapped up in the so-called Auction 73 for precious spectrum in the 700MHz band are still under tight FCC-imposed gag orders in an effort to stem any funny business, but it looks like they're at least ready to come out and dip their toes into the PR waters. Verizon, the biggest winner having claimed the big, wide Block C prize, says that it's "pleased with [its] auction results"... and that they're now better positioned to lead the way with new services and devices. Meanwhile, AT&T seems happy with its purchase, too -- but then again, it's not like any of these companies would be issuing immediate statements expressing buyer's remorse, we guess."



Verizon and AT&T both made out like bandits in the recent FCC spectrum auction. As noted above, Verizon came out on top with the coveted C Block and following behind with nothing but smiles was AT&T, which completed successful bids for the B Block. Along with AT&T's recent purchase of Aloha Partners, the largest owner of the 700MHz spectrum, AT&T can now boast that it covers over 95% of the U.S. population! The real winner of this auction though is Google. Even though Google did not come out of this auction with a pocket full of spectrum, it is safe to assume they accomplished exactly what they set out to do - force the bids high enough to ensure that the 700Mhz spectrum will be open to all devices, as well as keep over $4.6 billion dollars in the bank, and in their shareholders’ pockets.


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