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All posts tagged "DRM"


Thursday, January 22, 2009

Microsoft Brings Back DRM In UK's MSN Mobile Music

Posted by Ed Hansberry in "Thoughts Media Off Topic" @ 04:00 PM

http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/245859/...urn-to-drm.html

"Microsoft yesterday unveiled its MSN Mobile Music service - and a surprise return to digital rights management (DRM). While companies such as Apple and Amazon have finally moved to music download services free of copy protection, MSN Mobile locks tracks to the mobile handset they are downloaded to."

What in the world are they smoking over there in the UK? You can't transfer songs between your phone and PC, the price is nearly double that of DRM free music from iTunes, and the music is not transferable to a new phone. I kid you not! You have to read the Q&A between PC Pro Magazine and Hugh Griffiths, the head of Mobile Music. This is not a question of will this service survive, but in how many months will it totally implode unless someone gets bopped with a clue-stick.

How many of our UK friends are chomping at the bit to purchase songs for £1.50. For those of us in the US, that is $2.21 at today's exchange rate.

Tags: DRM

Thursday, January 15, 2009

The Rise And Fall Of The Music Industry

Posted by Ed Hansberry in "Pocket PC News" @ 07:00 PM

http://www.npr.org/rss/podcast.php?id=13

Yesterday on National Public Radio's "Fresh Air" program, Terry Gross interviewed Steve Knopper, a Rolling Stone contributing editor, on the history of the recording industry from the end of the vinyl era to the future. Of course, DRM and content protection are discussed at length, but are not the sole topic. Also discussed are the differences in the market caused by the advent of the CD, home computers, DAT, CD burner, MP3 player and on to the future where the CD may cease to exist and the music industry itself may struggle for relevance. Anyone that has ever downloaded a song illegally or has done so legally and then fought with DRM issues with their device(s) will enjoy this show. It lasts roughly 30 minutes. The main article link takes you to the RSS feed that you can copy and paste into your favorite podcasting software. It aired yesterday, but the RSS feed is showing it as a January 15 show. You'll know right away if you have the wrong one because it starts right into the story. Alternatively, you can download the MP3 file directly or use the WMA stream to whatever device or desktop you have.

Be sure to listen to the show before disputing anything. You may be surprised at some of the conclusions presented by Mr. Knopper.

Tags: DRM

Sunday, August 17, 2008

The Online Music Ripoff

Posted by Adam Krebs in "Digital Home Talk" @ 02:00 AM

http://www.pcpro.co.uk/features/218...poff/page1.html

"Why is DRM so contentious? Surely it's designed to protect the rights of artists and record companies in a climate where, as one international music industry body claims, illegal downloads swamp legitimate music store downloads by a ratio of 20 to 1? The problem is DRM doesn't affect the pirates, who upload and download DRM-free files often ripped directly from CD. Instead, it affects legitimate buyers in a range of deeply irritating ways. The first roadblock comes down to Gates' talk of "simplicity" and "interoperability", or rather the lack of both"

I think most people who know anything about DRM hate it. They hate dealing with the limitations of the technology, both intentionally built-in or as a direct result of poor technical planning/implementation. Unlike a good protection scheme which is invisible to the end user, DRM is too limiting to the average customer, and does nothing to stop hardcore music pirates. Plus, when a store goes down and its licenses stop renewing, the customer is the real loser. Sure you can burn your songs to a CD and re-rip them (or do it virtually), but the process is time-consuming and you lose audio fidelity. Another option is to free your purchased music using tools like FairUse4WM (above) or Hymn, or just buy DRM-free in the first place. Check out the article if you need yet another reason to hate DRM.


Monday, April 28, 2008

MSN Music To Delete DRM Keys - Say Goodbye To Your Music

Posted by Ed Hansberry in "Pocket PC Content" @ 08:00 AM

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/pos...c-drm-keys.html

"Customers who have purchased music from Microsoft's now-defunct MSN Music store are now facing a decision they never anticipated making: commit to which computers (and OS) they want to authorize forever, or give up access to the music they paid for. Why? Because Microsoft has decided that it's done supporting the service and will be turning off the MSN Music license servers by the end of this summer."

Just one more reason to love DRM. The only real option you have to keep your music is to burn it to CD then rip it back. That solution works ok for entire CD's downloaded, but it is a bit of a pain for individual songs as you have to spend a lot of time putting the song info back into the track, like the album name, artist, etc. This is why the only place I currently buy digital music from is Amazon, where their MP3's are unlocked to begin with.

Tags: DRM

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